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Land Survey Markers

Land survey markers or land survey monuments are objects that are placed in marking major survey points on the earth’s surface.  They are placed for use during surveys and for possible following surveys to come.  Markers are typically durable and are often intended to be permanent.  They can be as straightforward as a chisel mark or nail to as complex as stamped metal disks that are set into concrete or rock pillars.  The two most common types of survey markers used in land surveying include vertical elevation markers and horizontal position markers.

Land Survey Markers

Types of Survey Markers

Vertical elevation markers also known as benchmarks originate from chiseled horizontal markings made by surveyors.  These horizontal marks allow for an angle-iron to be placed forming a “bench”.  This bench that is formed allows for leveling rods to be placed and repositioned if necessary in the same place in the future.  This marking is usually indicated by a chiseled arrow below the horizontal line.

Land Surveying Markers

Horizontal position markers are used for triangulation are also known as trig points.  These points act as fixed stations for surveying projects. Trig points are usually set up by a government with recognized coordinate and elevations published.  Fixed stations are often found on peaks of hills which allow the ability to spot them from many directions.  Though these stations are no longer in use for surveying purposes they remain useful for navigational purposes.

Land Surveys Markers

Legalities with Survey Markers

In the United States and many other countries it is a misdemeanor to intentionally remove or destroy permanent survey markers.  Removal or destruction of survey markers should be reported to your local County Sheriff’s office or appropriate Police Department.  Survey markers can occasionally be destroyed during major construction sites and are sometimes impossible to protect due to the nature of work performed at these construction sites.  If this takes place, markers should be replaced or memorialized to maintain permanence of the historical record.

Land Survey Marker

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Posted on Wednesday 13th 2011f April 2011

When I bought my home, my neighbors had been in the habit of using part of the property as their own. They became quite angry when I began to mark out my garden in an area that they had been using, but which I knew (because of a permanent iron marker, and the map I'd received showing the angle of the line) was on my property. I couldn't find the permanent surveyors mark at the front, but I was about 20' inside where I knew the line must be.

When they began to consider selling, they had a survey done of their property, and it turned out to be very much in my favor, compared to what they had been claiming. The surveyor's marks were not of the permanent type---just sticks about 1" square with pink plastic ribbons tied to them. Wanting to maintain the findings of the survey (which I realize I had not paid for) I drove in an iron post just inside (to my side) of the wooden stakes, so I would be able, thenceforth, to respect the boundary---and also, so they wouldn't start encroaching again.

I wonder if anyone can tell me whether the wooden stakes have any legal standing, or can they be removed at will, by the neighbors? Today I found that one of the neighbors (no, I didn't actually see it happen, but...) had broken off the wooden marker---or maybe they hit it accidentally with their car---and pushed it into the ground some distance (about 18") inside the line, that is, onto my property.

I don't want to argue with them, and since I'm living on a very small social security check, there's no question of my taking it up in court. I don't want to nit-pick, but my past experience has been that they tend to push things by small increments that eventually add up to something more substantial. I don't know why the surveyor would leave just a wooden marker. I would love to have someone explain this to me.

Posted on Wednesday 13th 2011f April 2011

When I bought my home, my neighbors had been in the habit of using part of the property as their own. They became quite angry when I began to mark out my garden in an area that they had been using, but which I knew (because of a permanent iron marker, and the map I'd received showing the angle of the line) was on my property. I couldn't find the permanent surveyors mark at the front, but I was about 20' inside where I knew the line must be.

When they began to consider selling, they had a survey done of their property, and it turned out to be very much in my favor, compared to what they had been claiming. The surveyor's marks were not of the permanent type---just sticks about 1" square with pink plastic ribbons tied to them. Wanting to maintain the findings of the survey (which I realize I had not paid for) I drove in an iron post just inside (to my side) of the wooden stakes, so I would be able, thenceforth, to respect the boundary---and also, so they wouldn't start encroaching again.

I wonder if anyone can tell me whether the wooden stakes have any legal standing, or can they be removed at will, by the neighbors? Today I found that one of the neighbors (no, I didn't actually see it happen, but...) had broken off the wooden marker---or maybe they hit it accidentally with their car---and pushed it into the ground some distance (about 18") inside the line, that is, onto my property.

I don't want to argue with them, and since I'm living on a very small social security check, there's no question of my taking it up in court. I don't want to nit-pick, but my past experience has been that they tend to push things by small increments that eventually add up to something more substantial. I don't know why the surveyor would leave just a wooden marker. I would love to have someone explain this to me.

HOLLY

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